Pantozol: Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions and Recommendations

This medicine belongs to a group of medicines called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

Pump inhibitors work by decreasing the amount of acid the stomach produces, to relieve symptoms and allow healing to occur.

Proton pump inhibitors are also used to treat conditions such as stomach ulcers, intestinal ulcers, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, reflux esophagitis) by reducing the amount of acid the stomach produces.

Pantozol is also sometimes used in conjunction with antibiotics to treat stomach ulcers caused by bacteria known as H. pylori .

Pantozol can also be used to treat or reduce the risk of stomach ulcers due to medications known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which irritate the stomach.

Ulcers

It is used to treat and help heal duodenal and gastric ulcers. Depending on the position of the ulcer it is called a gastric or duodenal ulcer. A gastric ulcer occurs in the stomach.

A duodenal ulcer occurs in the duodenum, which is the tube leading out of the stomach. This may be due in part to too much acid being produced in the stomach.

Most people who have a peptic ulcer also have a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori in their stomach.

When pantozol is taken with antibiotics, the combination therapy will kill the Helicobacter pylori and allow your ulcer to heal.

Pantozol can also be used to prevent ulcers associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

These are medications used to relieve pain, swelling, and other symptoms of inflammation, including arthritis (inflammation of the joints).

Reflux disease

Pantozol is also used to treat reflux esophagitis or reflux disease. This can be caused by reflux of food and acid from the stomach into the food pipe, also known as the esophagus.

Reflux can cause a burning sensation in the chest that rises to the throat, also known as heartburn.

Pantozole is also used to prevent the relapse of reflux esophagitis.

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

Pantozole is used to treat a rare condition called Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, where the stomach produces large amounts of acid, much more than in ulcers and reflux disease.

Pantozole dosage information

The usual dose is one tablet per day. However, if your doctor also prescribes antibiotics in combination with this medicine for the treatment of duodenal ulcers, the dose is two per day.

The first tablet should be taken in the morning and the second tablet should be taken before dinner for 7 days. Your doctor will prescribe the correct dose for you.

The dose and frequency of pantozol that your doctor prescribes for you will depend on your medical condition. Your doctor may change the dose as your condition changes.

Usual Adult Dose for Erosive Esophagitis

Treatment of erosive esophagitis : 40 mg orally once a day for up to 8 weeks; however, an additional 8 weeks may be considered for patients who have not healed after initial treatment.

Safety and efficacy have not been established beyond 16 weeks of therapy.

Maintenance of healing for erosive esophagitis : 40 mg orally once daily. Controlled studies have been limited to 12 months of pantozole therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

To treat gastroesophageal reflux disease or heartburn, the recommended dose is 40 mg once a day for up to 4 weeks.

Parenteral : 40 mg once a day for 7 to 10 days, administered by intravenous infusion over a period of 15 minutes. Intravenous therapy should be stopped as soon as the patient can resume oral therapy.

Oral : 40 mg orally once a day, for short-term administration (up to 8 weeks); however, an additional 8 weeks may be considered for patients who have not healed after initial treatment.

Safety and efficacy have not been established beyond 16 weeks of therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer

To treat duodenal (intestinal) ulcers caused by H. pylori in adults, the dose of pantozole is 40 mg twice a day with amoxicillin 1,000 mg twice a day and clarithromycin 500 mg twice a day.

Or pantozole 40 mg twice daily with 500 mg metronidazole twice daily and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily. The usual duration of this treatment is 7 days.

Study (n = 54)

40 mg orally once a day, the dose was increased every 12 weeks in 40 mg increments up to a maximum of 120 mg per day, for 28 weeks.

Data have revealed that monotherapy with daily doses of 40 mg has been associated with complete healing of the duodenal ulcer in up to 87% and 94% of patients after 4 weeks and 8 weeks, respectively.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer

To prevent stomach ulcers associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, the dose is 20 mg once a day in the morning.

40 mg orally once a day. Data have revealed that 40 mg daily dose monotherapy has been associated with complete gastric ulcer healing in up to 87% and 97% of patients after 4 weeks and 8 weeks, respectively.

Usual Adult Dose for Helicobacter pylori Infection

Study (n = 242) – Triple therapy : 40 mg orally twice daily for 7 days, commonly in conjunction with clarithromycin and amoxicillin or metronidazole to eradicate Helicobacter pylori.

Followed by pantozole 40 mg orally once daily until day 28. Triple therapy has resulted in eradication rates greater than 95%.

The QUADRATE study (n = 405) – Quadruple therapy : 40 mg orally twice a day for 7 days, along with bismuth subcitrate and tetracycline, both four times a day, and metronidazole 200 mg three times a day and 400 mg at bedtime.

Helicobacter Pylori eradication was achieved in 82% of patients.

Usual Adult Dose for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Parenteral : 80 mg every 12 hours, administered by infusion of 15 minutes. Daily doses greater than 240 mg administered in equally divided doses by 15-minute infusion or administered for more than 6 days have not been studied.

Oral : 40 mg twice a day, up to a maximum of 240 mg per day. Some patients have been treated with pantozole for more than 2 years.

Usual Adult Dose for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

Study (n = 21) – Stress Ulcer Bleeding Prophylaxis in Critical Care Setting:

80 mg twice daily, as a bolus infusion over a 15-minute period, up to a maximum daily dose of 240 mg, divided into three equal doses.

Study (n = 20) – Peptic ulcer hemorrhagic prophylaxis after hemostasis in critical care setting:

Bolus 80 mg intravenous, followed by continuous infusion of 8 mg / h for 3 days, after which therapy can be continued with an oral PPI.

Usual Adult Dose for Peptic Ulcer

Study (n = 21) – Stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis in critical care setting.

80 mg twice daily, as a bolus infusion over a 15-minute period, up to a maximum daily dose of 240 mg, divided into three equal doses.

Study (n = 20) – Peptic ulcer hemorrhagic prophylaxis after hemostasis in critical care setting:

Bolus 80 mg intravenous, followed by continuous infusion of 8 mg / h for 3 days, after which therapy can be continued with an oral PPI.

How to take pantozol

Swallow the tablets whole with a little water with or without food. Do not crush or chew the tablets.

Pantozol tablets have a special coating to protect them from the acidic contents of your stomach. For the tablets to work effectively, this coating must not break.

If you are taking other medicines, such as antibiotics, in combination with pantozole treatment, carefully follow the instructions for the use of each medicine. Keep taking your medicine for as long as your doctor tells you.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at the same time. If you have trouble remembering to take your medicine, ask your pharmacist for some suggestions.

What happens if there is an overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the poison hotline. You will need to see your doctor regularly so he / she can monitor your condition.

Tell your doctor if you do not feel better while taking pantozol. Your doctor may recommend a further examination. Do not stop taking your medicine or change the dosage without checking with your doctor.

What should I avoid when using pantozol?

This medicine can cause diarrhea, which can be a sign of a new infection. If you have bloody or watery diarrhea, call your doctor. Don’t use antidiarrheal medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

What other drugs could interact with this medicine?

There may be an interaction between pantozole and any of the following:

  • Amphetamines, ‘azole’ antifungals (such as itraconazole, ketoconazole, voriconazole), bisphosphonates (such as alendronate, etidronate, risedronate), carbamazepine, clopidogrel, dabigatran, dabrafenib, delavirdine.
  • HIV protease inhibitors (eg, atazanavir, indinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir), iron salts, ledipasvir, mesalamine, methotrexate, methylphenidate, multivitamins with minerals, mycophenolate.
  • Nilotinib, pazopanib phenytoin, rifampin, rilpivirine, riociguat, ‘statins’ anti-cholesterol drugs (eg atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin).
  • Topotecan, certain tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg bosutinib, dasatinib, nilotinib), warfarin.

If you are taking any of these medications, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

Stop taking one of the medications, switch one of the medications to another, change the way you are taking one or both medications, or leave everything as is.

Side effects of pantozol

Like other medicines, pantozol can cause some side effects. If they do occur, most are likely to be minor and temporary. However, some can be serious and need medical attention.

Seek emergency medical attention if you have symptoms of an allergic reaction to pantozol: hives; labored breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor immediately if you have:

Severe stomach pain, bloody or watery diarrhea, new or unusual wrist, hip, or back pain; bruising or swelling when pantozole was injected intravenously.

New or worsening symptoms of lupus: joint pain or swelling with a rash on the cheeks or arms (worse in sunlight).

Kidney problems: urinating less than normal, blood in the urine, swelling, rapid weight gain.

Low magnesium symptoms: dizziness, irregular heartbeat, feeling jittery, muscle cramps, muscle spasms, coughing, or choking sensation.

Symptoms of low vitamin B: muscle weakness, irregular heartbeat, feeling dizzy or short of breath, pale skin, tiredness, mood swings, numbness or tingling in the arms and legs.

Taking pantozole long-term can cause you to develop stomach growths called fundic gland polyps. Talk to your doctor about this risk.

Common side effects of pantozol can include:

Headache, dizziness; stomach pain, gas, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea; joint pain; or symptoms of fever, rash, or cold (more common in children). Don’t be alarmed by this list. You may not experience any of them.

Tell your doctor as soon as possible if you notice any of the following:

Unusual tiredness or weakness, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, general feeling of being unwell, fever, itching, yellowing of the skin and eyes, and dark-colored urine, blood in the urine, increased or decreased need to urinate .

Skin problems such as itching and rash, or swelling, blistering or peeling of the skin, swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat that may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing

Frequent infections such as fever, severe chills, sore throat or mouth ulcers, chest pain, shortness of breath, high blood pressure, swelling of the legs, bleeding or bruising more easily than usual, depression, confusion or anxiety.

These can be serious side effects and you may need urgent medical attention. Serious side effects are rare. Tell your doctor if you notice anything that makes you feel unwell while you are taking, or shortly after you have finished taking pantozol.

Electrolyte balance : Long-term use of pantozole can cause the levels of electrolytes such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium in the blood to decrease.

Your doctor may perform blood tests periodically to monitor the levels of these electrolytes in your blood while you are taking this medicine.

Kidney function : If you have kidney disease or decreased kidney function, talk with your doctor about how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosage and effectiveness of this medication, and if any special monitoring is needed. .

Liver function : People with severe liver disease generally should not take more than 20 mg of pantozole per day.

If you have liver disease or reduced liver function, talk with your doctor about how this drug may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosage and effectiveness of this drug, and if any special monitoring is needed.

Interaction with methotrexate : If you are taking pantozole and are also going to receive a dose of methotrexate, talk with your doctor about how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosage and effectiveness of this medication, and if it is needed. some special control.

Osteoporotic Fractures : Long-term use of pantozol may be linked to an increased risk of bone fractures in the hip, wrist, or spine as a result of weak bones.

This risk increases even more if you are at risk of developing osteoporosis.

If you have osteoporosis or have risk factors for developing osteoporosis, talk with your doctor about how this drug may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosage and effectiveness of this drug, and if any special monitoring is needed.

Severe stomach problems : If you have recurring vomiting, difficulty swallowing, blood in your stools, significant unintended weight loss, fatigue (anemia), or are coughing up blood, see your doctor right away.

Pregnancy : This drug should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medicine, contact your doctor immediately.

Lactation : this drug passes into breast milk. If you are a nursing mother and you are taking pantozol, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue to breastfeed.

Children : The safety and efficacy of using this medicine has not been established for children.

Product description

What Pantozol Looks Like, tablets are available in 20mg and 40mg strengths. The tablets have an acid-resistant coating called an enteric coating.

20 mg tablets

Yellow-coated, oval, biconvex tablets, enteric-etched ‘P 40′ on one side, ’20’ on the other side.

40 mg tablets

Yellow-coated, oval, biconvex, enteric-etched ‘P 40′ on one side, ’40’ on the other side.

Ingredients : The active ingredient in the tablets is pantozole (as sodium sesquihydrate). The tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients:

Anhydrous lactose, crospovidone, microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, macrogol 8000, anhydrous sodium carbonate, methacrylic acid copolymer, triethyl citrate, purified talc, titanium dioxide and yellow iron oxide.

Non-medicinal ingredients : calcium stearate, colloidal silicon dioxide, mannitol, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, polyethylene glycol, anhydrous sodium carbonate, sodium starch glycolate, sodium hydroxide.

Eudragit (contains: methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer, sodium lauryl sulfate and polysorbate) and yellow opadry (contains: lecithin (soy), polyvinyl alcohol, talc and xanthan gum).

recommendations

Some self-help measures suggested below may help your condition. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about these measures and for more information.

Alcohol : Your doctor may advise you to limit your alcohol intake.

Aspirin and many other medications used to treat arthritis, menstrual pain, and headaches – These medications can irritate your stomach and make your condition worse. Your doctor or pharmacist can suggest other medicines that you can take.

Caffeine : Your doctor may advise you to limit the amount of beverages that contain caffeine, such as coffee, tea, cocoa, and cola drinks, as they contain ingredients that can irritate the stomach.

Eating habits : Eat smaller and more frequent meals. Eat slowly and chew your food carefully. Try not to rush into meals.

Smoking – Your doctor may advise you to quit smoking or at least cut back on tobacco use.

Weight : Your doctor may suggest losing some weight to help your condition.