Hydrochlorothiazide: What is it? Uses, Presentations, How to Use and Adverse Reactions

This medication is a thiazide diuretic, or water pill, that prevents the body from absorbing excess salt, which can cause fluid retention.

If you have hypertension , your doctor may prescribe blood pressure medications such as Hydrochlorothiazide, but you should know the benefits and side effects before taking them.

Applications

According to experts, Hydrochlorothiazide is the second most commonly prescribed antihypertensive in the United States, but researchers are not sure how or why the medication works to lower blood pressure.

Most blood pressure medications are prescribed in combination with other antihypertensive medications and lifestyle modifications that include weight loss and dietary restrictions are recommended.

Like most medications, Hydrochlorothiazide can cause side effects in some patients.

More often, it can cause upset stomach, dizziness or headache, especially at the beginning of treatment, as the body adjusts to blood pressure medications.

To reduce dizziness, patients are advised to get up slowly from sitting or lying down. In some cases, loss of vision or eye pain may occur. This is considered a serious side effect, and a doctor should be contacted immediately.

Hydrochlorothiazide belongs to the group of medicines called diuretics. It is also an antihypertensive.

It is used to decrease fluid retention ( edema ) caused by congestive heart failure, certain kidney or liver problems, and medications such as corticosteroids (for example, prednisone ) and estrogen.

It is also used to lower high blood pressure . Hydrochlorothiazide works by causing the body to lose excess water and salt.

Presentations

12.5 mg

Each flat, peach-colored round tablet with bevelled edges, with the “P” logo embossed on one side and smooth on the other side, contains Hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg.

Non-medicinal ingredients: alginic acid, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, colloidal silicon dioxide, FD & C Yellow aluminum lake No. 6, magnesium stearate and microcrystalline cellulose.

25 mg

Each flat, peach-colored round tablet with bevelled edges, marked “25” marked “P” on one side and smooth on the other side, contains Hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg.

Non-medicinal ingredients: alginic acid, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, colloidal silicon dioxide, FD & C Yellow aluminum lake No. 6, magnesium stearate and microcrystalline cellulose.

50 mg

Each round, peach-colored, flat-faced tablet with beveled edges, marked “50” marked “P” on one side and smooth on the other side, contains Hydrochlorothiazide 50 mg.

Non-medicinal ingredients: alginic acid, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, colloidal silicon dioxide, FD & C Yellow aluminum lake No. 6, magnesium stearate and microcrystalline cellulose.

How should I use this medication?

To reduce fluid retention (edema), the usual recommended dose of Hydrochlorothiazide in adults is 25 mg to 200 mg per day.

Some people may only need to take this medicine every other day or for 3 to 5 days a week, as directed by your doctor. For infants and children, the dose is based on body weight and is given in 2 divided doses.

For the treatment of high blood pressure, the usual recommended dose of Hydrochlorothiazide in adults is 12.5 mg to 50 mg daily.

When taken once a day, this medication should be taken in the morning to avoid the need to urinate during the night.

Who should avoid using Hydrochlorothiazide?

Do not use Hydrochlorothiazide if you:

  • They are allergic to medications with Hydrochlorothiazide, sulfonamide (for example, Sulfamethoxazole) or any of the drug components.
  • They can not urinate.
  • You have kidney disease that gets worse and reduces the production of urine while taking this medication.

Adverse reactions

Attend a medical consultation soon to present one or more of these adverse reactions:

  • Black, tarry stools.
  • Blisters, peeling on the skin.
  • Blood in the urine or in the stool.
  • Tos.
  • Pain in the joints.
  • Lumbar or lateral pain.
  • Pain or difficulty urinating.

Signs of too much loss of potassium: (dry mouth, increased thirst, irregular heartbeat, mood or mental changes, muscle cramps or pain, nausea or vomiting, unusual tiredness or weakness, weak pulse)

Signs of too much sodium loss: (confusion, seizures, decreased mental activity, irritability, muscle cramps, unusual tiredness or weakness) rash or hives stomach pain (severe) with nausea and vomiting burning or burning sensation unusual bleeding or bruising changes in vision yellow eyes or skin.

Seek immediate medical attention if any of the following symptoms occur:

  • Difficulty breathing (sudden)
  • Fever.
  • Chill.