Leiomyosarcoma: Definition, Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

Little known, but very dangerous.

Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) is a rare form of cancer that most commonly affects the uterus, but it can also affect other areas such as the bladder or the gastrointestinal system.

It is designated a “soft tissue sarcoma” and originates in smooth or involuntary muscle. LMS is considered malignant and is different from leiomyoma, which is benign. It is considered “treatable” when it is detected early.

Statistics of Leiomyosarcoma

LMS is rare, affecting only 6 in 1 million women, but it is very aggressive and likely infects other body areas, including the lungs.

Unlike other cancers that affect the uterus, LeiomLeiomyosarcoma does not usually respond to hormonal treatments and chemotherapeutic agents or radiation treatments that are sometimes inadequate.

If leiomyosarcoma cancer is detected early, surgical removal is the most effective treatment.

The “clear margin” of the tissue surrounding the tumor must be eliminated to eliminate cancer. This means that cancer, together with a portion of the tissue that looks healthy, should be surgically removed.

 

A new tumor may begin to grow if a cancer cell is left in the body.

More than half of all patients treated with LMS require additional treatments within 8 to 16 months after the initial administration.

The use of an energy Morcellator for the treatment against LeiomLeiomyosarcomanergy morcellator is a surgical device that has been used for gynecological surgical procedures.

It aims to eliminate tumors and diseased tissues or organs through minimally invasive surgery. Although it was designed to reduce the risk to patients, its use can also spread cancer cells when tumors are removed.

An energy morcellator is inserted into the abdominal cavity through a small incision similar to the incisions used for laparoscopic surgery.

The energy morcellator then “crumbles” the tissue to be removed, which is then sucked out of the abdomen without the need for a large abdominal incision.

Energy morcellators were invented to eliminate various tumors and other diseased tissues and organs, such as kidney tumors. Still, they have been used more frequently to remove the uterus.

They have been used in several myomectomies and hysterectomies for reasons such as fibroid tumors and other gynecological problems, including diagnosed and indeterminate leiomLeiomyosarcoma results use of a powerful morcellator can separate tumors leaving the cells of the torn tissue behind.

In the case of benign tumors such as fibroids, new fibroid tumors may begin to grow in other areas creating medical difficulties.

In the case of leiomLeiomyosarcoma, new malignant sarcoma cancers will spread, making the treatment of the deadly disease much more difficult.

Unfortunately, the appearance of leiomLeiomyosarcomanot is identified or hidden until surgical removal occurs. The effective use of morcellation makes the spread of leiomLeiomyosarcoma more likely.

Cancer, including leiomLeiomyosarcoma, has spread through morcellation and can affect any abdominal cavity organ, including the liver, kidneys, bladder, intestines, or abdominal wall.

Cancer cells that have been scattered due to morcellation can potentially enter the blood or lymphatic system and travel to other parts of the body such as bones, lungs, heart, or brain.

The five-year survival rate for patients with leiomLeiomyosarcomarastically reduced if cancer has spread and is only 4 to 16 percent.

symptom

Leiomyosarcoma or LMS is a rare and somewhat aggressive form of cancer that appears only in the body’s soft tissues.

In addition, it only appears in involuntary muscles, which means that it can appear anywhere in the body due to its ability to form in blood vessels. It is also partly a disguised disease.

It does not create any noticeable symptoms in its earliest stages and is usually diagnosed only after a patient develops very major complaints or symptoms, such as:

  •  Areas or nodules swollen in the body
  •  Abdominal swelling
  •  Unusual pain or swelling in any part of the body
  •  A change in menstruation (or vaginal bleeding after menopause)
  •  Difficulty breathing

It is important to remember that any sarcoma, including cancerous tumors of the LMS, can start as small, completely painless lumps under the skin.

Although they are often shown on the legs and arms, they can be anywhere, including the abdomen.

As they increase in size, they press on the surrounding areas, including the nerves, organs, blood vessels, and muscles.

Because of that, the symptoms may include a long list of other problems related to the tumor but not to the LMS itself.

Because the LeiomLeiomyosarcoma form of cancer usually travels through the bloodstream rather than through lymphatic tissues, it can not cause these tissues to swell.

This is a little different from other forms of cancer that tend to occur specifically with swollen lymph nodes or glands.

Origin of Leiomyosarcoma

Unfortunately, the nature of leiomLeiomyosarcomas is challenging to determine its actual source.

For example, to create treatments, it is essential to know which cells in an organ or soft tissue appear in the underlying cause of the development of the disease.

However, with the LMS, it can spread within a single organ without leaving distinctive marks or markers in its original form.

For example, some doctors postulate that uterine LMS can develop from the lining of the uterine blood vessels and not from the uterine wall muscles; however, this is difficult to determine.

However, the symptoms of uterine LMS would be similar to bleeding and colic, the sensation of heaviness in the pelvis, and the presence of fibroid (non-cancerous) tumors.

What to do after?

If you have a swelling in the body that has not been there before, it is always advisable to visit a doctor immediately – even if it is a painless swelling. There must also be a point at which you know if you are someone who has been exposed to the various risk factors for the development of the LMS.

Although there are no officially known causes for the development of the disease, there are many experts who agree that certain factors can put people at risk. These include:

  • Be over 50 years old.
  • Having been treated for cancer in the past using radiation therapy
  • Experiencing chronic edema in the extremities after surgical treatment (radical mastectomy is a common problem related to edema in the arms)
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Thyroid disorders
  • Disorders related to estrogen
  • Exposure to a long list of environmental chemicals and carcinogens
  • Chronic inflammation in the body
  • Other diseases

As you can see, that represents a tremendous amount of risk that could be applied to almost anyone.

However, if any of these risk factors apply to you, and you are also experiencing the other physical symptoms listed above, you should contact your doctor immediately.

Although most symptoms of LMS can be caused by a long list of other less severe conditions, it is best not to wait to see if more problems develop. Prevention is always the best solution.

Causes

The exact cause of leiomLeiomyosarcomanknown. The researchers speculate that genetic factors may play a contributing role in the grounds of LMS.

In individuals with cancer, including leiomLeiomyosarcomaignant tumors may develop due to abnormal changes in the structure and orientation of specific cells known as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes.

Oncogenes control cell growth; tumor suppressor genes control cell division and ensure that cells die at the right time. The specific cause of the changes in these genes is unknown.

However, current research suggests that the DNA anomalies (deoxyribonucleic acid), the body’s genetic code carrier, are the underlying basis of malignant cell transformation.

These abnormal genetic changes can occur spontaneously for unknown reasons or, more rarely, can be inherited.

Treatment

Due to the rarity of these tumors and the need for a treatment team of multiple specialties, the best treatment can be carried out in a specialized center with experience in sarcoma care.

Treatment planning begins with a multidisciplinary review of the patient’s history, all available radiographic images, and the pathological results of the biopsy.

Then a treatment plan is formulated based on the contributions of orthopedic and general surgeons, musculoskeletal radiologists, pathologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists.

Surgery

Local control of soft tissue sarcomas is usually achieved with surgical resection. Preoperative planning based on radiographic and pathological information is essential to ensure adequate surgical margins. Achieving wide surgical margins is necessary to prevent local recurrence.

Radiation therapy

Many tumors involve or are directly adjacent to vital structures. In these cases, achieving a wide surgical margin is impossible.

Radiotherapy is an additional treatment to improve local control rates when surgical margins are close, especially in high-grade sarcomas.

Radiotherapy can be administered preoperatively (neoadjuvant) or postoperatively (adjuvant). Radiotherapy can also be used for local palliative control in cases where extensive metastasis has already occurred.

Chemotherapy

The primary function of chemotherapy is in the treatment of metastatic disease. While it is not curative, it can slow systemic disease progression.

Agents used in some sarcoma centers include: doxorubicin and ifosfamide, gemcitabine and taxotere (docetaxel), dacarbazine and ecteinascidin.

Research studies are currently being conducted to identify other agents useful in treating leiomLeiomyosarcomamotherapy is sometimes used as an adjuvant in treating localized sarcomas.

No clear survival benefit has been demonstrated in retroperitoneal leiomyosarcomas. However, preoperative chemotherapy can help reduce the tumor away from vital structures and improve the ability of surgeons to successfully remove a large tumor successfully.

In localized leiomLeiomyosarcomahe extremities, there may be a survival benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based regimens.

Both retrospective and prospective studies have shown a benefit for neoadjuvant regimens based on doxorubicin and ifosfamide in patients with large high-grade sarcomas (> 8 cm).

Little known, but very dangerous.

Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) is a rare form of cancer that most commonly affects the uterus, but it can also affect other areas such as the bladder or the gastrointestinal system.

It is designated a “soft tissue sarcoma” and originates in smooth or involuntary muscle. LMS is considered malignant and is different from leiomyoma, which is benign. It is considered “treatable” when it is detected early.

Statistics of Leiomyosarcoma

LMS is rare, affecting only 6 in 1 million women, but it is very aggressive and likely infects other body areas, including the lungs.

Unlike other cancers that affect the uterus, LeiomLeiomyosarcoma not usually respond to hormonal treatments and chemotherapeutic agents or radiation treatments that are sometimes inadequate.

If leiomyosarcoma cancer is detected early, the most effective treatment is usually surgical removal.

The “clear margin” of the tissue surrounding the tumor must be stopped to eliminate cancer. This means that cancer, together with a portion of the tissue that looks healthy, should be surgically removed.

 

A new tumor may begin to grow if a cancer cell is left in the body.

More than half of all patients treated with LMS require additional treatments within 8 to 16 months after the initial administration.

The use of an energy Morcellator for the treatment against LeiomLeiomyosarcomanergy morcellator is a surgical device that has been used for gynecological surgical procedures.

It aims to eliminate tumors and diseased tissues or organs through minimally invasive surgery. Although it was designed to reduce the risk to patients, its use can also spread cancer cells when tumors are removed.

An energy morcellator is inserted into the abdominal cavity through a small incision similar to the incisions used for laparoscopic surgery.

The energy morcellator then “crumbles” the tissue to be removed, which is then sucked out of the abdomen without the need for a large abdominal incision.

Energy morcellators were invented to eliminate various tumors and other diseased tissues and organs, such as kidney tumors. Still, they have been used more frequently to remove the uterus.

They have been used in several myomectomies and hysterectomies for reasons such as fibroid tumors and other gynecological problems, including diagnosed and indeterminate leiomLeiomyosarcoma results use of a powerful morcellator can separate tumors leaving the cells of the torn tissue behind.

In the case of benign tumors such as fibroids, new fibroid tumors may begin to grow in other areas creating medical difficulties.

In the case of leiomLeiomyosarcoma, new sarcoma cancers that are malignant will spread, making the treatment of the deadly disease much more difficult.

Unfortunately, the appearance of leiomLeiomyosarcomanot is identified or hidden until surgical removal occurs. The effective use of morcellation makes the spread of leiomLeiomyosarcoma more likely.

Cancer, including leiomLeiomyosarcoma, has spread through morcellation and can affect any abdominal cavity organ, including the liver, kidneys, bladder, intestines, or abdominal wall.

Cancer cells that have been scattered due to morcellation can potentially enter the blood or lymphatic system and travel to other parts of the body such as bones, lungs, heart, or brain.

The five-year survival rate for patients with leiomLeiomyosarcomarastically reduced if cancer has spread and is only 4 to 16 percent.

symptom

Leiomyosarcoma, or LMS, is a rare and somewhat aggressive form of cancer that appears only in the soft tissues of the body.

In addition, it only appears in involuntary muscles, which means that it can appear anywhere in the body due to its ability to form in blood vessels. It is also partly a disguised disease.

It does not create any noticeable symptoms in its earliest stages and is usually diagnosed only after a patient develops very prominent complaints or symptoms, such as:

  •  Areas or nodules swollen in the body
  •  Abdominal swelling
  •  Unusual pain or swelling in any part of the body
  •  A change in menstruation (or vaginal bleeding after menopause)
  •  Difficulty breathing

It is important to remember that any sarcoma, including cancerous tumors of the LMS, can start as small, completely painless lumps under the skin.

Although they are often shown on the legs and arms, they can be anywhere, including the abdomen.

As they increase in size, they press on the surrounding areas, including the nerves, organs, blood vessels, and muscles.

Because of that, the symptoms may include a long list of other problems related to the tumor but not to the LMS itself.

Because the LeiomLeiomyosarcoma form of cancer usually travels through the bloodstream rather than through lymphatic tissues, it can not cause these tissues to swell.

This is a little different from other forms of cancer that tend to occur specifically with swollen lymph nodes or glands.

Origin of Leiomyosarcoma

Unfortunately, the nature of leiomLeiomyosarcomas is challenging to determine its actual source.

For example, to create treatments, it is essential to know which cells in an organ or soft tissue appear in the underlying cause of the development of the disease.

However, with the LMS, it can spread within a single organ without leaving distinctive marks or markers in its original form.

For example, some doctors postulate that uterine LMS can develop from the lining of the uterine blood vessels and not from the uterine wall muscles; however, this is difficult to determine.

However, the symptoms of uterine LMS would be similar to bleeding and colic, the sensation of heaviness in the pelvis, and the presence of fibroid (non-cancerous) tumors.

What to do after?

If you have a swelling in the body that has not been there before, it is always advisable to visit a doctor immediately – even if it is a painless swelling. There must also be a point at which you know if you are someone who has been exposed to the various risk factors for the development of the LMS.

Although there are no officially known causes for the development of the disease, there are many experts who agree that certain factors can put people at risk. These include:

  • Be over 50 years old.
  • Having been treated for cancer in the past using radiation therapy
  • Experiencing chronic edema in the extremities after surgical treatment (radical mastectomy is a common problem related to edema in the arms)
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Thyroid disorders
  • Disorders related to estrogen
  • Exposure to a long list of environmental chemicals and carcinogens
  • Chronic inflammation in the body
  • Other diseases

As you can see, that represents a tremendous amount of risk that could be applied to almost anyone.

However, if any of these risk factors apply to you, and you are also experiencing the other physical symptoms listed above, you should contact your doctor immediately.

Although most symptoms of LMS can be caused by a long list of other less severe conditions, it is best not to wait to see if more problems develop. Prevention is always the best solution.

Causes

The exact cause of leiomLeiomyosarcomanknown. The researchers speculate that genetic factors may play a contributing role in the grounds of LMS.

In individuals with cancer, including leiomLeiomyosarcomaignant tumors may develop due to abnormal changes in the structure and orientation of specific cells known as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes.

Oncogenes control cell growth; tumor suppressor genes control cell division and ensure that cells die at the right time. The specific cause of the changes in these genes is unknown.

However, current research suggests that the DNA anomalies (deoxyribonucleic acid), the carrier of the body’s genetic code, are the underlying basis of malignant cell transformation.

These abnormal genetic changes can occur spontaneously for unknown reasons or, more rarely, can be inherited.

Treatment

Due to the rarity of these tumors and the need for a treatment team of multiple specialties, the best treatment can be carried out in a specialized center with experience in sarcoma care.

Treatment planning begins with a multidisciplinary review of the patient’s history, all available radiographic images, and the pathological results of the biopsy.

Then a treatment plan is formulated based on the contributions of orthopedic and general surgeons, musculoskeletal radiologists, pathologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists.

Surgery

Local control of soft tissue sarcomas is usually achieved with surgical resection. Preoperative planning based on radiographic and pathological information is essential to ensure adequate surgical margins. Achieving wide surgical margins is necessary to prevent local recurrence.

Radiation therapy

Many tumors involve or are directly adjacent to vital structures. In these cases, achieving a wide surgical margin is impossible.

Radiotherapy is an additional treatment to improve local control rates when surgical margins are close, especially in high-grade sarcomas.

Radiotherapy can be administered preoperatively (neoadjuvant) or postoperatively (adjuvant). Radiotherapy can also be used for local palliative control in cases where extensive metastasis has already occurred.

Chemotherapy

The primary function of chemotherapy is in the treatment of metastatic disease. While it is not curative, it can slow systemic disease progression.

Agents used in some sarcoma centers include: doxorubicin and ifosfamide, gemcitabine and taxotere (docetaxel), dacarbazine and ecteinascidin.

Research studies are currently being conducted to identify other agents that may be useful in treating leiomLeiomyosarcomamotherapy is sometimes used as an adjuvant in treating localized sarcomas.

No clear survival benefit has been demonstrated in retroperitoneal leiomyosarcomas. However, preoperative chemotherapy can help reduce the tumor away from vital structures and improve the ability of surgeons to successfully remove a large tumor successfully.

In localized leiomLeiomyosarcomahe extremities, there may be a survival benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based regimens.

Both retrospective and prospective studies have shown a benefit for neoadjuvant regimens based on doxorubicin and ifosfamide in patients with large high-grade sarcomas (> 8 cm).