Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Diet and Treatment, Expert Advice

Current Overview of Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Large Intestine Syndrome

There are diseases that, in recent years, have been cautiously deteriorating the quality of life of the inhabitants of any country without the population being sufficiently informed to arm themselves against this disease.

Many of these conditions have to do with the type of life that a particular subject carries, where factors such as stress are crucial to understanding the reason for the manifestation of this or that condition.

This is what happens with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, which may have underestimated its effects in recent years; its presence has been increasing in the main cities of the first world.

At present, this syndrome affects between 25 and 45 million Americans. The majority are women. People are more likely to get the disease in their teens and when they reach 40 years of age.

This syndrome is a mixture of discomfort or abdominal pain and problems with bowel habits.

It is not a threat to life and is not exposed to other colon conditions such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, and colon cancer. However, it can be an ongoing problem that changes how you live your life.

 

People with the syndrome may miss work or school more often; they may even feel less able to participate in daily activities. Some people may need to change their work environment: work at home, change work hours and even not work at all.

What are the symptoms?

People with the syndrome have symptoms that may include:

  • Diarrhea (often described as violent episodes of diarrhea).
  • Constipation.
  • Alternative constipation with diarrhea.
  • Belly pains or cramps, usually in the lower half of the belly, get worse after meals and feel better after a bowel movement.
  • Too much gas or swelling.
  • The stools are harder or loose than usual.
  • Develop a great belly.
  • Stress can make symptoms worse.
  • Some people also have urinary symptoms or sexual problems.

There are four types of this condition.

  1. With constipation
  2. With diarrhea
  3. Some people have an alternative pattern of constipation and diarrhea. This is called mixed irritable colon syndrome.
  4. Other people do not easily fit into these categories, qualified as irritable bowel syndrome without subtype.

Changes in diet

With some fundamental changes in diet and activities, the SCI will improve over time. Here are some tips to help reduce symptoms:

  • Avoid caffeine (in coffee, tea, and soft drinks).
  • Add more fiber to your diet with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nuts.
  • Drink at least three to four glasses of water per day.
  • No Smoking.
  • Learn to relax by exercising more or reducing stress in your life.
  • Limit the amount of milk or cheese you eat.
  • Eat smaller meals more often instead of copious meals.
  • Keep a record of the foods you eat to find out which foods bring episodes of the syndrome.

Changes in lifestyle

In general, with some basic changes in diet and activities, IBS will improve over time. Here are some tips to help reduce symptoms:

  • Add more fiber to your diet with fruits, vegetables, whole grains and nuts.
  • Drink at least three to four glasses of water per day.
  • Learn to relax, either by exercising more or reducing stress in your life.
  • Limit the amount of milk or cheese you eat.
  • Eat smaller meals more often instead of large meals.

We see how the syndrome of the large intestine (also known as this) is in intimate relation to the lifestyle of the people and that its cure implies taking a more relaxed life.

Always remember that before similar conditions or illnesses, the best thing you can do is go to the doctor or shift to perform the relevant analysis of the case.

That is to say, one should always avoid self-medication or try any pill only to attenuate the pain at the moment without foreseeing that the damage may be more significant.